Sony STR7055 Receiver

May, 2011

Sony STR7055 Receiver

Some of you have known my fascination for monster receivers.
Vintage Stereo Collection
Firing up these 100+ watt brutes is like pedal-to-the-metal with 200 horses under your hood on an empty freeway. With their sheer size and back-breaking weight, these monsters have the ability to grab your speakers by their balls without breaking any electronic sweat.

Not all though possess such power. It goes without saying that BOTL and MOTL models fall below the 100w/ch range. But by no means are these lesser creatures in terms of musicality.
I read somewhere that there is a certain magic within the 60watt/ch range- the reason why designers during that golden age of audio were limiting the power within this scope. Even at the onset of so called hi end audio, this range was the realm of classics such as the Quicksilver monoblocks, Citations II, ARC D75, CJ MV50, Julius Futterman OTL’s, etc..
Same is true with vintage SS receivers. The Marantz 2275 and Sansui 7070 are both heralded by some quarters to be more musical than their TOTL brothers. I did an AB with the 9090db and the 35 watt (stereo mode) QRX7500. I hated to admit it, but the QRX did have an edge over the 9090db in terms of warmth and musicality.

Which brings me to my present daily driver – the Sony STR 7055

Sony STR 7055

Considering that this is not a TOTL model, it’s remarkable that Sony threw in all the features one can think of on this model. Aside from the regular bells and whistles found in most models at that time, the 7055 boasts of 3 speaker outputs, modes for streo, mono, reverse, and even a pre out! – an option only for the TOTL models in other brands. Tone controls are terrific to use; no sudden sound surges. Amongst all the receivers that I’ve had, this has the best tuner section, period. Pulls in stations with ease even without the antenna.

The Sony STR 7055 clocks in at a “mere’ 45w/ch but sings a mouthful of warmth and musicality. I am reluctant to use the term, but yes, the 7055 does mimic a tube-like character.

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Comments
2 Responses to “Sony STR7055 Receiver”
  1. Jon says:

    Hello,
    I am just getting started on my new stereo journey and I decided to go vintage. I would love to have the Sansui 9090db or Marantz 2325 but my budget is small, especially when I have to take into account speakers and turntable. That brings me to my questions. After reading your review of the Sony STR-7055, I have decided to make that my first purchase. Can you recommend a nice pair of speakers for a small room that would compliment the receiver. I also need to purchase a turntable because that’s going to be my main listening pleasure. I was thinking about the Sony PS-8750 or Technics-SL-1700-MK2. I would love any recommendations you might have for my speakers and turntable to get me started down a wonderful path.

    Thanks,
    Jon

    • bb3 says:

      Hi Jon,
      The STR7055 has a nice warm midbass bloom. I have tried these with vintage AR3As, Dynaco A25s, JBL Century, Epicure LV 100s with great sonic results – of course, each speaker dishing out its own sonic character. For the newer models, the Onkyo Liverpool D2 and Sony La Voces also showed similar impressive results. Other speakers that I would have want to try out would be the Celestion SL6 or Spica TC50. Mostly vintage stuff, as you can see.

      I’m sure the newer ‘hiend’ speakers could really make the Sony sing but plunking in thousands of dollars on a Harbeth or Proac just doesn’t seem sensible.

      I’m not really familiar with turntables, the different brands/models. I’d play it safe with the Technics. If you could find a none-DJed (read not abused) SL1200, you’re good to go. Otherwise the SL1500 or 1300 is also a good alternative. I’d go for the older Mark 1 series though. Pair these with a good Audio Technica cart (AT OC9 if you could still find one) would be a good starter before you decide to go Grado and higher once the Analog Bug bites you bad. 🙂

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